Posts Tagged ‘Xenosmilus hodsonae’

The Cookie Cutter Cat (Xenosmilus hodsonae)

June 13, 2017

Larry Martin is the paleontologist who invented the fanciful name of “cookie cutter cat” for this extinct species.  He proposed this big carnivore killed its prey by taking a bite and retreating, thereby removing a piece of flesh like a cookie cutter removes a section of dough.  Supposedly, the cat then waited around for its victim to die from the wound.  I don’t buy it.  It seems unlikely a predator would cease attacking a wounded animal.  Instead, I believe this powerfully built animal held its prey down with its sturdy forelimbs and bit through the throat.  I suspect this is how all species of fanged cats dispatched their prey.

The cookie cutter cat is a newly recognized species.  Though commercial fossil collectors discovered 2 nearly complete skeletons at the Haile fossil site in 1981, scientists didn’t identify it as a new species until 20 years later.  At first scientists assumed it was a scimitar-toothed cat (Dinobastis serus) based on skull and dentition.  There were 2 lines of fanged cats during the Pleistocene in North America–the scimitar-tooths or Homotheridae and the saber-tooths or Smilodontheridae.  Both belonged to the subfamily Machairodontinae.  Scimitar-tooths were previously known to be long-limbed and built for chasing down prey, while saber-tooths were robust and built for ambushing their victims.  However, paleontologists eventually realized the cookie cutter cat was an exception.  It was a scimitar-tooth cat built for ambushing its prey, like the saber-tooth line of cats.  Cookie cutter cats were robust and powerful and short-limbed.

Mounted skeleton of the extinct cookie cutter cat.  It was stout like a bear and about the size of a lion.

Fossils of cookie cutter cats have been found at 7 sites in Florida including Haile, Sarasota, Citrus County, Levy County, Santa Fe River, Hillsborough, and Marion County.  Specimens identified as belonging to the Xenosmilus genus  have also been found in Arizona and Uruguay.  Cookie cutter cats are known to have lived during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene between 2.5 million years BP-1.5 million years BP.  The specimens at Haile were associated with many bones of peccaries, a likely prey item.

References:

Martin, Larry; and J. Babiarz, J, Hearst, and V. Naples

“Three Ways to be a Saber-tooth Cat”

The Science of Nature 87 (1) 2000

See also the University of Florida Museum web article.– https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/florida-vertebrate-fossils/species/xenosmilus-hodsonae

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements