Posts Tagged ‘rapid evolution’

Rapid Anole (Anolis carolinensis) Evolution

August 21, 2017

Misinformed creationists some times ask, if evolution is true, why isn’t it happening now?  There is a simple answer to that question.  Evolution is an ongoing process, and it IS happening now.  Evidence of continuing evolution isn’t readily apparent to the non-observant eye because usually it is a slow process–evolution often requires generations of natural selection to influence the phenotypical changes that demonstrate it.  However,  scientists discovered an example of evolution that occurred within 1 generation of an anole population in south Texas.  A team of scientists had recently studied the differences in cold tolerance between the population of anoles that live in south Texas with those that live near the northern limits of their range.  The south Texas anoles lose muscular coordination when temperatures drop to about 51 degrees F, while anoles near the northern limits of their range lose coordination when temperatures reach 43 degrees F.  An unusual cold snap struck south Texas shortly after scientists gathered this data, and they took another look at this anole population.  They discovered that exposure to cold temperatures changed the DNA of south Texas anoles.  4 genomic regions, especially those related to nervous system function, changed.  The lizards had rapidly evolved the ability to retain muscle coordination at lower temperatures, and they will pass these genetic changes on to the next generation.  This is a perfect example of evolution, defined as the change over time in the genetic characteristics of a population.  Most creationists can’t even define evolution.  They reject the fundamental basis of all biological science because it interferes with their belief in the supernatural.  Let’s see them try to deny this case study.

Anole characteristic threat display.

Anoles are a successful and rapidly evolving species. Some populations have adapted to city living, having evolved stickier toe pads that enable them to climb window glass.  In Florida the brown Cuban anole was accidentally introduced.  They occupy the same niche as the American anole.  In areas colonized by this alien anole, native anoles evolved larger toes that allow them to climb thinner branches.  This occurred in less than 15 years (20 generations for anoles living in Florida).  So now, areas with both species of anoles have a niche partition–Cuban anoles occupy lower branches, while native anoles live in the tree tops.

Worldwide, there are 391 species of anoles, but 9 are closely related to the species (A. carolinensis) that is widespread in the southeastern U.S.  Genetic studies suggests all 9 of these species descend from a founder population originating on Cuba.  A. carolinensis diverged from western Cuban anoles about 6 million years ago.  This occurred as a rafting event when a tropical storm washed debris from Cuba to the Gulf Coast of North America.  At least 1 male and 1 female were clinging to the debris when it made landfall.  All Caribbean islands were populated by anoles originating on Cuba from similar rafting events.

Fossil evidence of anoles has been excavated from 1 site in Georgia (Ladds), 1 site in Alabama (Bell Cave), and 10 sites in Florida.  None date to older than the mid-Pleistocene, but genetic evidence indicates they’ve occurred in southeastern North America since the late Miocene.

References:

Campbell-Staten, Shane; et. al.

“Winter Storms Drive Rapid Phenotype, Regulation, and Genome Shift in the Green Anole Lizard”

Science August 4, 2017

Glor, Richard; J. Losos, A. Larso

“Out of Cuba: Overwater Dispersal and Speciation Among Lizards in the Anolis subgroup”

Molecular Ecology 14 2005

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