Posts Tagged ‘lampshade spiders’

Spider Romance or How to Eat your Mate

October 25, 2017

Halloween decorations often include mock spider webs  because many people think of spiders as creepy.  I don’t.  I think they are fascinating.  There are over 44,000 known species of spiders in the world with about 400 new species named every year.  Most spiders trap their prey in the sticky substance produced in their abdomen, then they quickly pounce on the struggling insect and inject a paralyzing venom that liquefies the insides.  After their prey is subdued the spider sucks the juices from the helpless victim.  I suppose that is an horrifying fate for insects, but people have nothing to fear from such a small organism so vulnerable to a rolled up newspaper.  (I never kill spiders.  Instead, I catch and release them, if they invade my house.)  The spider’s strategy of trapping prey in a web poses a dilemma for males seeking a mate.  It is difficult for a female spider to discern the difference between food and potential sex.  Male spiders must tap on the web in a certain way, communicating to the female they are a sperm donor, not a trapped fly. Mistakes are occasionally made.

Female spiders are larger than male spiders, but in some genera sexual dimorphism is extreme.  Evolution has led to female gigantism among orb-weaving spiders.  Nature has selected for large females and small males in orb-weavers for 4 reasons: a) large females are more fertile and produce more eggs, b) larger females are less likely to fall prey to predators, c) small males reach sexual maturity at an earlier age, and d) small males are better climbers and can reach females faster than others when journeying up the web.  If after sex, a female spider eats a male, there is no great loss.  The female has already been fertilized, and the male is more useful as extra nutrition.  This reproductive strategy is not satisfactory for lampshade spiders.  Female lampshade spiders have larger bodies than males, but the males do have longer legs.  This gives male lampshade spiders the ability to escape after mating, so they can impregnate other females.

Image result for large female spider, small male spider

Female and male banana spiders (Nephilia clavipes).  Evolution has selected for large females and small males in spiders.  

Lampshade spiders construct webs in the shape of a lampshade, hence the name.  Females are larger than males in this species as well, but the males have longer legs, so they can escape after mating.

Humans are not as different from spiders as one might think, especially considering risky sex.  People aware of sexually transmitted diseases, including deadly AIDS, are still often willing to have unprotected sex with strangers.  Men and women cheat on their significant others, even though they realize their jealous partner might shoot or stab them, if their indiscretion is discovered.  And some people, mostly men, pay dominatrixes to bind them, putting them in a situation not dissimilar from male orb-weaver spiders.

Many men are attracted to woman who are larger than they are.  My personal preference is for women with really large breasts and buttocks, and I don’t mind if a woman is heavier than I am.  But some men have a fetish for extremely large women…in fact unrealistically giant women, known as giantesses.  They fantasize about a woman who can hold them in the palm of their hand.  The desire male spiders have for gigantic female spiders evidently exists in some human males as well.  Though psychological triggers in the environment probably influence this fetish, there must be something deep inside the mating urge, providing the platform for it to develop in people.  This template is something we share with spiders and likely goes back to a common ancestor over 500 million years ago.

Image result for giantess fetish

Many men are turned on by women who are much larger than they are.  Some even fantasize about giantesses.

The association of sexual excitement with fear of being eaten is another characteristic some humans share with spiders and other creatures.  I’m 55 years old, and I thought I was aware of every sexual fetish, but I first learned about the vore fetish within the last year.  Vore is short for devour–some people are sexually excited by the thought of being eaten by their sexual partner.  I don’t really understand this fantasy.  How, for example, does one reach sexual satisfaction after they’ve been eaten?  I think maybe this fantasy has something to do with being in the warm amniotic sac of a woman’s tummy.  Or maybe some are really thrilled with the thought sex might lead to their consumption.  Nevertheless, deep down inside, humans are like spiders in more ways than we would like to admit.

Image result for giantess fetish

People are not as different from spiders as one might think.  Some people get sexually excited at the thought of being eaten by their mate.  It’s known as a vore fetish.

Reference:

Kuntac, Matjaz; Jonathan Coddington

“Discovery of the Largest Orb-Weaving Spider Species: The Evolution of Gigantism in Nephilia”

Plos 1  October 2009