Posts Tagged ‘did large carnivores influence dune formation in Pleistocene Georgia’

Did Large Carnivores Influence Dune Formation in Ice Age Georgia?

July 26, 2018

Over 100 years ago Australians built a 3480 mile long fence to keep dingoes away from livestock. For ecologists this provides a grand experiment of how the exclusion of a large predator influences ecosystems. However, there exists a considerable amount of conflicting scientific literature about this. Many studies report overgrazed regions on the dingo-less side of the fence that have poor soils as a result. The fence bisects a national park. One study confined to part of this park counted 85 dingoes and 8 kangaroos on the side of the fence with the dingoes, and 1 dingo and 3200 kangaroos in a comparably sized lot on the side that is supposed to be without dingoes. Tame livestock, feral goats and hogs, and rabbits along with the kangaroos contribute to these overgrazed landscapes. Parma wallabies, the greater bilby, and small rodents thrive on the side of the fence with the dingoes because the large canines suppress populations of smaller predators. Another study that claims to be more comprehensive than any other found no differences between either side of the fence. The authors of this study suggest there are no differences because dingoes have never been completely eliminated on the supposedly dingo-less side of the fence. They say other studies concluding there is a difference are local and anecdotal.

Image result for dingoes and sand dunes

Dingo on a sand dune.

I think the most interesting study is a recent paper that found the presence of dingoes influenced sand dune formation in arid regions. On the dingo-less side of the fence sand dunes were larger and stabilized with shrubby plants growing on top. On the side of the fence with dingoes sand dunes were more shallow, bald, and dispersed by wind because plant growth was sparse. This seems counterintuitive. But this difference in dune formation is caused by the suppression of small carnivore populations. Dingoes reduce populations of foxes and feral cats (neither of which are native to Australia). In turn dusky hopping mice and rabbit populations increase, and they eat the seeds of plants and shrub saplings that keep dunes stabilized.

This last study is most interesting to me because sand dunes rolled across parts of Georgia during the coldest driest stages of Ice Ages, and I wonder if large predators influenced their shape and pattern. The arid climate caused some small rivers in Georgia to run dry. Wind blew the riverine sand into big dunes that are still evident today, though scrubby vegetation has since stabilized them. (See: https://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/the-ohoopee-sand-dunes/ ) I’ve hypothesized overgrazing by megafauna alongside shrinking water holes located in the river bed may have contributed to the erosion leading to sand dune formation. But maybe the presence of large carnivores played a role as well. Dire wolves, jaguars, and cougars suppressed populations of bobcats and foxes; causing an increase in rodent and rabbit numbers. The small herbivores stripped the vegetation bare, allowing sand dunes to roll. On the other hand hawks, owls, and snakes probably always remained abundant, and they likely provided a check on rodent and rabbit populations. Nevertheless, the notion large carnivores may have influenced dune formation in Georgia is an intriguing idea.

References:

Glen, A.; and C. Dietman, M. Soule, and B. Mackey
“Evaluating the Role of the Dingo as a Trophic Regulator in Australian Ecosystems”
Australian Ecology August 2007

Harris, Emma
“Dingoes have Changed the Actual Shape of the Australian Desert”
The Atlantic July 6, 2018