Pleistocene Cuckoos (Coccyzus sp.)

June 8, 2019

I frequently hear yellow-billed cuckoos (C. americanus) during summer, but I almost never see them.  They spend most of their time perched in tree tops and they blend in well, so they are difficult to spot.  I’ve never even seen this species perched, but I have occasionally spotted them flying in front of me, while I’m jogging or driving.  They are long birds with reddish brown wings and a checkered tail.  I discovered this species lives in my neighborhood a few years ago when I was learning bird calls from the Cornell University ornithology website.  I searched for yellow-billed cuckoos on this site and was pleasantly surprised to recognize their distinctive call.  Here’s a link.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow-billed_Cuckoo/sounds

Video of a perched cuckoo.  I’ve never seen one perched. Old timers called these birds rain crows because they will sometimes call in response to thunder.

Yellow-billed cuckoos spend summers in North America and winter in South America.  Caterpillars are the most important item in their diet, and they specialize in eating large spiny caterpillars that taste bad to most other species of birds.  They are so well-adapted to eating caterpillars that when their stomachs become clogged with spines, they vomit up their stomach lining and grow a new one.  They also feed on other large insects such as cicadas, locusts, and dragonflies.  Fruit balances out the rest of their diet.  They lay their eggs at intervals, and their nests often contain different aged nestlings.  The young are covered in porcupine like quills, and they are capable of climbing trees to avoid predators.  They leave the nest just 17 days after hatching.

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Yellow-billed cuckoo range map.

2 other species of cuckoos in the coccyzus genus live in North America–the black-billed cuckoo (C. erythropthalmus) and the mangrove cuckoo (C. minor).  Surprisingly, genetic evidence suggests the black-billed cuckoo is not a sister species of the yellow-billed cuckoo.  The black-billed cuckoo also summers in North America and winters in South America, but it breeds in more northerly locations.  These species independently evolved the habit of migrating north to find summer breeding ranges.  The pearly-breasted cuckoo (C. euleri), restricted to South America, is a sister species to the yellow-billed.  I looked at a photo of this species and I can’t tell the difference between the 2.  The mangrove cuckoo ranges from South Florida and the Bahamas to the coasts of Mexico and Central America.

Fossil evidence of cuckoos in the coccyzus genus has been excavated from sites in Florida, Virginia, the Bahamas, Dominican Republic, and Bolivia.  They are a bird of deep forest and therefore the process of preservation is rare in their habitat, explaining why they are absent in much of the fossil record.  Coccyzus cuckoos likely increased in abundance during warmer wetter stages of climate.

Cuckoos belong to the Cucilidae family which includes 135-147 species, depending upon the taxonomist’s opinion.  All Eurasian species are parasitic–they lay their eggs in other birds nests.  (These are the species depicted in cuckoo clocks.)  Yellow-billed cuckoos are occasionally parasitic.  During times of plenty when there are outbreaks of fall webworms or tent caterpillars, they will lay an egg in the nests of other cuckoos, robins, catbirds, or woodthrushes.  The cuculidae family also includes anis of South America and Mexico, coucals of Melanesia and Australia, and New World ground cuckoos.  Roadrunners belong to the New World ground cuckoos.  Most other species of New World ground cuckoos are parasitic, and 1 species specializes in preying upon army ants.

References:

Forbush, Ed

A Natural History of American Birds of Eastern and Central North America

Bramhall House 1955

Hughes, Janice

“Phylogeny of the Cuckoo Genus Coccyzus (Aves: Cuculidae): a test of monophyly”

Systematics and Biochemistry 2006

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Cooking an Old Rooster

June 1, 2019

Not many people know this, but every single packaged chicken in chain grocery stores is a female.  Most male chickens are aborted upon hatching because they don’t lay eggs and fight each other all the time and accordingly are not economical to keep.  Before modern agriculture when most rural folks kept chickens, they ate their roosters.  The classic French dish, chicken coq au vin, is made by slow cooking an old tough rooster in wine.  On a recent visit to a new Vietnamese grocery store I found a rooster.  It costs 3 times more than most grocery store chickens, but I wanted to try making the classic French dish authentically, so I sprung for it.

Asian supermarkets sell birds with the head and feet attached.  The cock’s comb is edible according to some vintage cookbooks, but it looks like cartilage to me.  I gave it to the cats.

First I butchered the rooster into 10 pieces.  (I wrapped up the feet and put them in the freezer for future stock-making.)  Next, I dredged the chicken in seasoned flour and browned the pieces in bacon grease.  I placed the pieces in a casserole dish and sautéed mushrooms and onions in the pan I browned the chicken in.  I smothered the chicken with the onions and mushrooms and deglazed the other pan with red wine.  I used an inexpensive Merlot.  I poured the wine on the chicken and vegetables.  I happened to have parsley so I sprinkled chopped parsley over this.  I covered the casserole dish and put it inside the oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour.  If I had to do it over again, I would go with 300 degrees for 2 hours.  The first temperature and time would be perfect for a grocery store broiling hen, but it didn’t tenderize the rooster as much as I would’ve liked.  Nevertheless, I enjoyed eating the rooster.  The flesh had a better texture than most grocery store chickens.  Almost all grocery store chickens are embalmed with a salt water solution, and in my opinion this gives the flesh a weird texture.  I’ve given up even looking for non-embalmed chickens.  Producers inject salt water in chickens because modern breeds have such large breasts, the white meat will dry out without the solution.  This dish is traditionally served with pearl onions, but I just used a regular chopped onion.  The wine gravy is delicious and really pairs well with the meat.

The finished product. Tastes like chicken.

 

Irksome Pundit Speak: That said at the End of the Day he Doubled Down and It is What It Is

May 26, 2019

I watch too many cable news shows.  News networks that strictly report news get killed in the ratings, so most are 50% news and 50% opinion.  News networks hire pundits who comment on the news of the day.  Most pundits are has-been politicians or former aides to has-been politicians.  Almost all use annoying clichés that drive me crazy.  They can use a whole string of clichés to complete a sentence that in essence is completely meaningless.  Pundits can have entire conversations with each other without saying anything.  Here are some of the clichés they use that are the most irksome.

That said. Pundits use “that said” after they make 1 point and want to address a counterpoint.  The phrase is extraneous.  It is unnecessary to say “that said” because they already said something, and the viewers know what they just said.  I’ve even come across this phrase in written editorials.  I want to tell them “you didn’t say it, you wrote it, you idiot.” Whatever happened to the good old fashioned “however” or “on the other hand.”

At the end of the day. Pundits use “at the end of the day” to conclude their point.  Again, this is a completely unnecessary phrase.  When a pundit is finished making their point all they need to do is shut up and let somebody else speak.  Besides there is never an end to a political argument–they go on forever, long past the “end of the day.”

He doubled down. Pundits use this to describe a politician who makes a terrible gaffe, but instead of apologizing or admitting they misspoke, they defend their idiotic statement.  For example a politician could claim there was such a thing as consensual rape. (A Missouri state senator actually said this a few weeks ago.  What is it about Missouri politicians and their absurd views about “legitimate”  and “consensual” rape?) Instead of apologizing or admitting he misspoke the politician might say “there is consensual rape and 15 year old girls should be drafted to serve as sex slaves for our patriotic soldiers.”  Politicians who refuse to admit they said something dumb are not doubling anything.  They are just stupid.

It is what it is. This is perhaps the most meaningless cliché of all.  It means absolutely nothing  I can’t even explain what people are saying when they use this phrase.  It was what it was and could if it could but it would what it would.  What? I suggest to anyone with the urge to say “it is what it is” to just shut the hell up.

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Hardball with Chris Matthews is my favorite cable news show.  He asks the tough questions.  Usually.

Sicily During the Late Pleistocene

May 19, 2019

Over the past few weeks I read The Sicilian by Mario Puzo, author of the famous Godfather series.  He also wrote the screenplays for The Godfather and Christopher Reeve Superman movies.  His early novels were critically acclaimed but didn’t sell, so a publisher suggested he write a novel that focused on the mafia.  In his earlier novels the mafia played just a small role.  He followed this advice only to see The Godfather rejected 20 times before he finally found a publisher.  The Sicilian is every bit as good, and I’m surprised it hasn’t been adapted for the cinema.  Mario Puzo doesn’t describe the nature of Sicily much in his novel.  He does describe the island as quite arid, and he frequently mentions the “red hawks” soaring in the sky.  As a supplement to enjoying this novel I engaged in a brief study of Sicily’s natural history.

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The “red hawks” referred to in his book were probably red kites (Milvus milvus), a threatened species.

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Location of Sicily.  

Sea level fluctuations during the Pleistocene led to intermittent land bridges connecting Sicily to mainland Europe and as a consequence Sicilian flora and fauna descend from species arriving from that continent.  The location of the island in the Mediterranean Sea moderated climate, and species that disappeared from most of Europe during severe Ice Ages found refuge on Sicily.  The region is now known for mild wet winters and hot dry summers.  Average annual temperatures were likely slightly cooler during stadials.  Myrtle, oak, and cork trees covered lower elevations, while oak-beech forests occupied higher elevations.  Volcanic mountains and abundant rivers vary the landscape.

Species of large animals living on Sicily during the late Pleistocene included bison, aurochs, horse, fallow deer, red deer, roe deer, wild boar, brown bear, cave lion, hyena, wolf, and giant tortoise.  2 unique species lived on the island then–a dwarf elephant (Palaeoloxodon mnaidriensis) and the dwarf Sicilian hippo (Hippopotamus pentlandi).  The dwarf elephant was closely related to the extant Asian elephant.  It weighed just 3000 pounds, and the species also occurred on the nearby island of Malta.  Both the dwarf elephant and the Sicilian hippo became extinct shortly after man colonized Sicily about 14,000 years ago.

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Artist’s depiction of P. mnaidriensis along with a few swans.  I don’t believe it is drawn correctly to scale, unless this is the depiction of a juvenile.  Dwarf elephants were small but they weren’t this small.

People gradually eroded the quality and quantity of wildlife on Sicily, and they utterly destroyed the natural ecosystems.  Most of the island was deforested during Roman rule, leading to prolonged droughts, and the last wolves were  exterminated during the 1920s.  Though 150 species of birds live on the island, including flamingoes and several species of eagles, many are endangered.  However, the island is home to Nebrodi Mountains National Park where roe deer, wild boar, hares, Eurasian red squirrels, crested porcupines, wild cats, and foxes still roam.  Small towns founded during the Byzantine Empire are scattered throughout the park, and farmers keep rare breeds of horses and black pigs here.  The oldest chestnut tree in the world (more than 2000 years old) grows on Mt. Etna.

I’m going to read a book about the human history of Sicily next and will write a blog article about it when I’m finished.

Reference:

Bofiglo, L. et. al.

“Bio-chronology of Pleistocene Vertebrate Faunas of Sicily and Correlation of Vertebrate Bearing Deposits with Marine Deposits”

Il Quaternario 16 (1BIS) 2003

 

Did Pleistocene Tapirs Shit in the Woods?

May 12, 2019

The answer is not as obvious as it might seem.  A new study found extant lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) defecate more often in degraded woodlands than in deep forests.  They spend more time in disturbed forest openings that have been logged or burned because they feed upon young plants sprouting in the increased sunlight after canopy tree removal.  The study suggests tapirs facilitate forest regeneration by defecating viable seeds in their dung.  Scientists estimated the average tapir shits about 10,000 viable seeds per year in disturbed forests–3X more than in undisturbed forests.

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Lowland tapir standing near a forest edge.  They actually shit more next to the woods than in it.

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Mountain tapir (T. pinchaque).  This is the only species of extant tapir adapted to cooler climates.  The extinct species of tapir that formerly lived in southeastern North America was likely adapted to temperate climates, like this species.

The extinct Vero tapir (Tapirus veroensis) roamed across southeastern North America during the Pleistocene, and this species likely played an important role in forest regeneration then as well.  Herds of mammoths and mastodons stripped bark from trees, often killing them.  This was especially true during droughts when mammoths, normally grass-eaters, were forced to dine on the edible parts of trees.  Flocks of passenger pigeons also wiped out whole sections of forest.  Tornadoes and ice storms left large gaps in the forest canopy.  Tapirs attracted to these disturbed areas helped them regenerate.

Studies of extinct tapir bone chemistry indicate tapirs preferred to eat plants that occurred in deep forests.  However, they likely ate the young saplings that sprouted in gaps within forests.  Some of the plants tapirs may have consumed included pokeberry, persimmon, pawpaw, Osage orange, honey locust, wild squash, blueberry, composites, maple, and oak. These are plants that quickly colonize forest gaps.  And tapirs didn’t often shit in the woods.  Instead, they crapped on the edge of the woods or in open gaps within the woods.

Reference:

Paolucci, L.; C. Rattis, R. Pereira, and D. Silverio

“Lowland Tapirs Facilitate Seed Dispersal in Degraded Amazonian Forests”

Biotropica Feb. 2019

The Hoyo Negro Fossil Site Keeps Producing Surprises

May 5, 2019

I’ve already written about the Hoyo Negro fossil site located in Yucatan, Mexico twice (See: https://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2015/08/08/the-hoyo-negro-fossil-site-in-yucatan-mexico/ and https://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2017/09/13/new-species-of-late-pleistocene-ground-sloth-and-peccary-discovered-on-yucatan-peninsula/ ), but new and interesting discoveries keep happening inside this underwater cave.  Scuba divers previously found a 13,000 year old human skeleton, the bones of 30 species of large mammals, and bat guano, containing valuable paleoecological evidence at this site.  Included among the mammal specimens were 3 extinct animals new to science–2 species of ground sloth (Xibalbaonyx oviceps and Nahochichak xibalbahakah) and 1 species of peccary (Mucknalia minimas).  Recently, scuba divers found another human skeleton here, this 1 dated to 12,000 years BP; and scientists identified the bones of 2 species of extinct carnivores previously thought to have been restricted to South America.

A team of paleontologists looking through bones excavated from Hoyo Negro realized 1 labeled as coyote had been misidentified.  The remains actually belonged to Protocyon troglodytes, an extinct wolf-like animal.  Subfossils of this species have been excavated from sites located in 6 South American countries, but this is the first time a specimen has ever been found in North America.  This team of paleontologists also recognized a bear skull misidentified as belonging to a spectacled bear was actually the skull of an Arctotherium wingei. This species of extinct bear was known from fossil sites in 3 South American countries, and this specimen is also a first from North America.  Photos of bear fossils from other sites in the Yucatan peninsula indicate these also are Arctotherium.  These discoveries extend the known northern range limits of these species by over 1200 miles.

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I think this photo is the Arctotherium skull found in the Hoyo Negro.  This specimen is preserved better than any previously known.

The Yucatan peninsula supported a unique fauna during the last Ice Age.  Paleontologists recently named a new species of extinct jaguar (Panthera balamoides) from a few bones found at another site in the region. This means there were 4 species of large mammals living on the Yucatan that may not have been found anywhere else.  Moreover,  both North and South American species had ranges that overlapped here and possibly nowhere else.  For example dire wolves co-existed here with protocyon, another predatory canid.  It seems likely a vast desert grassland isolated the Yucatan peninsula during Ice Ages.  However, the proximity of the Caribbean Sea allowed for more precipitation on the peninsula than farther inland.  This fostered the growth of jungles and wetlands that supported a greater variety of fauna, and new species that were different from populations on the other side of the desert evolved in this isolated paleoenvironment.

Reference:

Schubert, Blaine; et. al.

“Yucatan Carnivores Shed Light on Great Biotic Interchange”

Biology Letters May 2019

Pleistocene Mulberries (Morus sp.)

April 28, 2019

Ordering fruit trees from a catalogue or internet site is a dodgy endeavor.  The trees are overpriced with an added cost of shipping, and in my experience I’ve learned the trees produce poor quality fruit, if they even survive long enough to bear.  I’ve had much better luck transplanting trees from local nurseries.  I have 26 year old grape vines and blueberry bushes almost as old that I purchased from local nurseries, and I’d still probably have a great fig tree, if plumbers didn’t have to dig a new drain field for my septic tank.  Peach trees I’ve grown from seed are much stronger and produce much better fruit than any I ever purchased through the mail.  A mulberry tree growing by the side of my house is an example of mail order disappointment.  The tree is thriving and flowers every spring but it produces no fruit.  This puzzled me until I finally figured out why.  The tree died back the first year I bought it, but it regrew from the stump.  Nurseries sell mulberry trees with male and female branches.  (Male flowers produce no fruit.)  Unfortunately, the part that grew back on my tree is all male.

Male flower on my mulberry tree.  Female flowers have a more round shape.  All the flowers on my mulberry are male, much to my disappointment.  Click to enlarge the photo.

Mulberries belong to an ancient family that has existed since at least the mid-Cretaceous, and dinosaurs likely dispersed the seeds of the fruit from this family in their feces.  The Moraceae family includes mulberries, figs, Osage orange, jack fruit, and bread fruit.  The species of native mulberry common and widespread in eastern North America is Morus rubra.  The range map of this species shows some affinity in its northern limit with the ghost boundary of the Laurentide Glacier.  (See https://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/the-ghost-boundary-of-the-last-glacial-maximum-ice-margin/ ) However, like many other species of trees M. rubra successfully recolonized some territory that became deglaciated following the last Ice Age.  It’s likely red mulberry grew in mixed forests all the way to the glacial boundary during Ice Ages but became much more common during warmer wetter interstadials and interglacials.  Mulberry trees prefer early to mid successional woodlands where they can get plenty of sunlight.  Hence, they are a pioneer species dispersed in bird droppings.  Disturbed plant communities caused by rapid climate change and megafauna foraging were common during the Pleistocene and so were mulberries, though their pollen is rarely detected in core samples.

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Range map of the red mulberry.  It has been widely transplanted outside its range.  Avian dispersal helped this species recolonize deglaciated regions following the end of the last Ice Age.

Birds love mulberries, and avian dispersal explains how mulberries recolonized deglaciated regions when so many other species did not.  A study of 1 backyard mulberry tree in Arkansas counted 32 species of birds feeding on the fruit.  Cedar waxwings and robins made up 77% of the individual birds visiting the tree.  Other birds feeding on the fruit from this tree included mockingbirds, finches, catbirds, eastern kingbirds, and warblers. The fruit appeals to bird species that normally prefer insects.

Mulberries were especially common around Indian villages during Colonial times and earlier.  William Bartram mentioned M. rubra  at least 20 times in his Travels. Mulberries ripen over a 3 week period during late May and early June and were an important earl summer fruit for the Indians.  They can be dried and dried mulberries are a staple in Afghanistan.  European settlers brought white mulberries (M. alba) to North America, hoping to start a silk industry.  For 4 thousand years the Chinese have been raising the silk worm moth (Bombyx mora), a species no longer found in the wild.  The silk worm moth larva feed upon mulberry leaves and produce silk for their cocoon.  The silk industry collapsed in North America long ago and now they grow wild, often hybridizing with native mulberries.

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Silkworm moth larva feeding on mulberry leaves.

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Red mulberry fruit.  Despite the name, they aren’t ripe until they turn black.

Mulberries are very sweet and nutritious.  They are high in Vitamin C and iron and also a good source of potassium, Vitamin K, Vitamin E, and fiber.  They are rich in cholesterol-reducing and cancer-fighting anti-oxidants.  They make good desserts as well, but they do have 1 drawback.  The stem grows well into the fruit and is difficult to remove.

Reference:

Jackson, J; and R. Kanin

“Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas”

Journal of Arkansas Academy of Science 2016

Paper Clowns

April 20, 2019

When I was in my mid-20s I was not an ambitious person.  I happened to be looking through the want ads 1 day and I thought I  found an ideal job.  A company would send me the material to construct paper clowns, and I would send them back, and they would pay me $5 for each clown I constructed.  I thought I could also save money by not having to drive to work everyday.  Better yet, it sounded like a job I could manage while high on pot.  I eagerly told my mother about this opportunity, but she was not enthused.  Instead, she gently insisted I get a real job with insurance benefits and paid vacations.  I did go out and get a real job and went on to meet my wife indirectly through work.  My mom was rewarded with a granddaughter, and I avoided the ignominy of being the kind of adult who lives in their parents’ basement and never really grows up.  There are many ways my mom influenced my life, but this incident always comes to mind when I think about them.

This is my mom with my father, my younger sisters, and me in 1967.

My mother, Audrey Gelbart, was born on  August 5th, 1939, in Cleveland, Ohio.  She was the product of a mixed marriage–her mother was a Yankee from New York and her father was a southerner from Georgia.  She grew up in Willoughby, Ohio with 2 brothers and a sister.  After graduating from high school she worked as a secretary in an hospital where she met my father who was a resident doctor there.  They married in 1961 and by 1966 they had 3 children.  She raised us while my father was busy working, and she always kept her house ultra clean.  She was a patient, sweet-tempered mother and grandmother, and a devoted wife.  She took good care of my father, especially during his many health crises, until his death in 2014.  My mom passed away on April 19th 2019.  We will miss her.

Flemish Carbonnade and Parsnip Pie

April 15, 2019

A good beef stew generally beats any fancy decorated plate constructed by 4 star chefs.  I like a beef stew recipe from Belgium known as a Flemish carbonnade because it gives me an excuse to buy beer.  It is a simple dish to make.  Cut about 1.5 pounds of a bottom round beef roast into 1-2 inch squares, season with salt, and brown in butter.  Put them in a crock pot and brown 2 diced onions in the pan the beef was browned in.  Sprinkle a little salt on this and when the onions are translucent, add them to the beef in the crockpot.  Cover the beef and onions with 1 bottle of good dark beer–I prefer Guinness with this recipe but any dark stout beer is good.  Add a good tablespoon of mustard and stir.  Then set the crockpot on low for 4-5 hours.  You can serve it on mashed potatoes, but I usually add the potatoes directly into the stew to thicken after the stew is finished.  Chopped parsley is nice on this, if you happen to have it.  Beef, mustard, beer, and onions really go together.

Carbonnade

I was looking for a parsnip in Kroger 1 day, but all they had were 2 1 pound bags wrapped together and cheaply priced.  They were probably trying to get rid of them because parsnips are not particularly popular, especially in the south.  They were formerly a common vegetable grown in northern Europe, but following the introduction of the potato from the Americas, they’ve declined in importance.  The parsnip is related to the carrot, and they have a sweet aromatic flavor. I suppose people prefer the bland starchy taste of potatoes that can absorb flavors of what they are served with.  Parsnips are the 2nd most important ingredient in a good Jewish chicken soup–they contribute a nice sweet flavor to the broth.

I bought the whole bag and I didn’t want to waste the rest of the parsnips, so I invented a recipe for parsnips.  I decided to try making it like a sweet potato pie.  Other recipes for parsnip pie that I found on the internet were savory, but mine is a dessert.  First, I boiled 1.5 cups of diced parsnips until they were soft.  I mashed them in a bowl and added 2 beaten eggs, 1 can of sweetened condensed milk, 1/3rd cup of brown sugar, along with nutmeg, cinnamon, and ground ginger.  I mixed this well and put it in a pie shell.  Then I baked it in a 350 degree oven for about 45 minutes.  I served the pieces with whipped cream.  Everybody liked it.

Parsnip pie

Pleistocene Microfauna Inherited the Earth

April 8, 2019

The biblical passage “Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth” always makes me think of the late Pleistocene megafauna extinctions.  The passage is part of Jesus’s sermon on the mount and is found in Matthew 5:5, though for some reason Luke omits it.  Most biblical scholars believe the word meek in this passage means powerless, and it represents the slaves and the small powerless Christian sect within the Roman Empire.  A large segment of the Roman Empire’s population consisted of slaves, and the Christian religion appealed to them because of the concept that their miserable lives might be rewarded in the afterlife, if they believed in Jesus.  Ironically, after the Roman Emperor Constantine made Christianity the official religion of the empire centuries later, Christians no longer acted meek–they oppressed all other religions. The late Pleistocene extinctions make me think of this passage because so many powerful animals such as giant lions, saber-tooths, short-faced bears, dire wolves, mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, and giant bison all disappeared from the face of the earth; but small animals continued to live and were just as common as they’d always been.  Among them are 2 of the smallest mammals on earth–the southern short-tailed shrew (Blarina carolinensis) and the eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus).

Photo of a short-tailed shrew my cats killed last week.

The southern short-tailed shrew weighs between .5-1 ounce.  They hunt in burrows near the surface but also scurry though more permanent burrows located up to 2 feet underground.  They eat half their own weight in food everyday.  Their diet consists of worms, spiders, centipedes, insects, snails, amphibians, and mice.  During winter they can subsist on fruit, acorns, and fungi.   They are smaller than mice but can subdue them with a venomous bite.  Southern short-tailed shrew specimens have been recorded from at least 23 Pleistocene-aged fossil sites, including the Isle of Hope in southeast Georgia.

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Eastern pipistrelle.

The eastern pipistrelle weighs between .1-.3 ounce and is about the size of a large moth.  Their wingspan reaches a width of only about 2 inches.  They feed upon flying insects.  Both eastern pipistrelles and short-tailed shrews navigate in the dark by using echolocation.  Fossil specimens of this species have been found from at least 19 Pleistocene-aged fossil sites including Ladds in north Georgia.

Of course, not all species that inherited the earth are meek.  Man is a notable exception.