How far South did the Extinct Stag-Moose (Cervalces scotti) Range During the Late Pleistocene?

A species of extinct deer, slightly larger than a modern day moose (Alces alces), occurred south of the ice sheets during the late Pleistocene.  It is alternatively known as stag-moose or elk-moose, but its scientific name is Cervalces scotti. This giant deer had the long nose of a moose, though its antlers were more like those of an elk.  However, it shared a closer common ancestor with the former.  They inhabited wetlands surrounded by mixed forests dominated by spruce but with significant elements of pine and hardwoods.  Like modern day moose, they fed upon aquatic plants during summer and twigs during winter.  Mastodons occupied a similar habitat and fed on the same foods, so the 2 species often co-occurred together.

Evidence from the fossil record suggests stag-moose were particularly abundant in midwestern bogs left by retreating glaciers.  Stag-moose bones are quite commonly found in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and New York.  Surprisingly, they occurred even farther south with isolated fossil remains having been discovered in Virginia, Arkansas, Mississippi, and South Carolina.  The stag-moose remains found in Desha and Philips County, Arkansas and Rosedale, Mississippi are at 34 degrees latitude.  These consist of antler fragments and a jawbone with a tooth.  The stag-moose specimen from Charleston, South Carolina (just a tooth) occurred at 32 degrees latitude.  This is probably close to the southern limits of its former range because stag-moose remains are completely absent from sites in fossil rich Florida.

Image result for cervalces scotti

Artist’s depiction of the stag-moose.  They were huge. That is a lot of venison.

A stag-moose skeleton found in Chippewa Lake, Medina, Ohio had 1 bone that had attached sediment filled with pollen representing the type of environment it lived in.  The pollen included fir, maple, alder, aspen, birch, hickory, hackberry, hazelnut, ironwood, pine, oak, basswood, elm, spruce, cedar, ragweed, grass, and cattail.  Spruce pollen made up 60% of the total.  It seems likely the type of environment favored by the stag-moose, as far south as Charleston, South Carolina, included various compositional ratios of these species.  I hypothesize stag-moose occurred in the mid-south during cool moist interstadials rather than the coldest driest stages of Ice Ages.  Wetlands would’ve been more common during these climatic phases.  Full blown glacial maximums restricted stag-moose habitat because desert scrub and grassland habitat expanded then.

Although there is no supporting archaeological evidence, I think overhunting by humans caused the extinction of the stag-moose.  Man colonized North America when ice sheets covered most of Canada, thus restricting stag-moose to more temperate regions where humans became common enough to impact their populations.  When the glaciers began to recede, optimal stag-moose habitat increased, but humans had already decimated their populations into extinction.  Modern day moose crossed the Bering land bridge, and ecologically replaced the stag-moose and were able to survive in northern latitudes where human populations remained too scarce to overhunt them.

Reference:

Mcdonald, Greg; R. Glotchober

“Partial Skeleton of an Elk-Moose, Cervalces scotti, from Chippewa Lake, Medina County Ohio”

Research Paper 2017

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2 Responses to “How far South did the Extinct Stag-Moose (Cervalces scotti) Range During the Late Pleistocene?”

  1. ina puustinen-westerholm Says:

    Healing here..from the new metal knee/glue/spike..implant. Good to have some reading material. Thanks much.

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